Author Archive

“Blaine’

This is my brother Blaine. He died by a gun 15 years ago. He and I grew up shooting in youth clubs and his passion throughout his life was competitive target shooting.

The words are the NRA bylaws.

“Blaine” 60″ x 37″  Ink on panel

 

Detail:

 

 


“Mike”

Mike was drafted into the army in 1968 during the Vietnam War. He served in the 1st Calvary as a helicopter gunner and was shot down by a rocket after 8 months.

The text Is The Gulf of Tonkin Resolution of 1964 which authorized the use of conventional military forces in Vietnam without a Declaration of War by Congress. 1968 was the year of the Tet Offensive which proved to be the turning point of U.S. involvement.

“Mike” Ink on panel  60″ x 37″

 

Detail:


“Angelin”

Angelin is the daughter of my friends who are first generation Mexican Immigrants.

The text is the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 which was the first federal law to ban an entire ethnic group from immigrating to the United States

“Angelin”  Ink on panel 60″ x 37″

 

p 23 angelin web

 

Detail:

p 23 angelin 01p 23 angelin 02


“Fleeting Glance” 41×35

The dynamics of moving water reveal an unseen treasure

W 15 Fleeting Glance 41x35 web

 


“Prone” 35×41

A wave breaks in the deep blue sea revealing prone figure that vanishes as quickly as it appears

W 14 Prone35x41 web


“Ascension” 41×35

I am getting closer to depicting the human form in my latest water series. I use hundreds of layers of subtle color to bury the light deep in the painting.

W 16 Ascension 41x35 web


“Open” 35×41

Another piece in an ongoing series interpreting water and its movement and interaction with air. I am playing with value and color. Specifically, the background is closer in value to the following layers depicting air. Most of the light and form are from the back.

W 13 Open 41x35 web.jpg


“Topside” 41×35

A continuation of my exploration of water.

 

W 12 Topside 41x35 web


“Justine”

This is Justine, in the 1930’s her great grandmother moved her family from New York to the Watts neighborhood in south Los Angeles amid a backdrop of intense racial discrimination. One of the many faces this discrimination took was in the form of housing covenants, deed restrictions and extralegal measures that restricted minorities from living in many parts of Los Angeles. They were limited by covenants as well as a narrow access to financing known as redlining. These covenants were a part of southern California housing since the late nineteenth century and they were struck down partially in 1948 and then completely in 1953.

The words I chose to use in the formation of this portrait are sections from current residential deeds that still to this day contain the covenants restricting ownership to whites only, though they lack any legal standing. I also chose to use the words from the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Justine stands as a testament to her family’s strength and tenacity in the face of a system of governance that is biased against them.

“Justine”  60″x37″ Ink on panel

 

21 Justine web

 

Detail:

21 Justine a web

21 Justine b web


“Elon”

This is Elon, “My father survived the Holocaust but lost his entire immediate family. His mother and two sisters were victims of an SS roundup and mass execution. His father was killed by Ukrainian militia, right in front of him. It’s my responsibility to bear witness for all of them.”

The words are the Nuremberg Race Laws  of 1935. The Nazis implemented these laws to ostracize, discriminate and expel Jews from German society.

Elon stands in defiance of this injustice.

The weight of history is carried by the generations that follow. May we never repeat this history

60″ x 37″ Ink on panel

20 Elon web

 

Detail:

20 Elon a web

20 Elon b web


“Protester”

Given the weight of the news of the day I wanted to post an image and idea out there. This is an image from Elon Shoenholz’s photo archive documenting the protest marches that have occurred since November 2016. She was photographed in the first protest march following the elections. The marks that form the drawing are the words of the Declaration of Sentiments from 1848, which is one of the first documents to claim equal rights for women. It marked the beginning of the women’s rights movement.

60″x37″ Ink on panel

 

19 Feminist web

Detail:

19 Feminist a web

19 Feminist b web


“Marcus”

This is the third in a series of six I plan on doing in this format 60?x37″.

I met “Marcus” sleeping on the streets at Venice and West Ave. and I started thinking about homelessness and the feeling of being powerless. I knew I wanted to draw him and wanted to depict him as an equal in the eyes of our government. I choose to use the text from the Bill of Rights as my mark as it reaffirms the ideas of individual rights and equality that are the values upon which our nation was built. Portraying him seated filling half the frame lets him represent the inequity that is our reality.

60″ x 37″ Ink on panel

 

18 Marcus web

Detail:

18 Marcus b web

18 Marcus a web


Review in Fabrik

Wonderful Review in Fabrik by Jimmy Centeno

http://thisisfabrik.com/review-beauty-awash-in-a-sea-of-bad-news-by-bryan-ida/

Fabrik Review 05

 


“Grandfather”

This is a portrait of my grandfather drawn from a photograph taken in 1942,  by Dorothea Lange when she was commissioned to photograph Japanese Americans being interned during the start of the US entry into World War 2. The marks are the text from Executive Order no. 9066 which established military areas excluding those of Japanese descent and establishing the internment camps.

I only met my grandfather in the hospital briefly as he died when I was very young. Drawing him was a way of getting to know him and imagining what he was thinking as he was led to an unknown future. Historical context is everything but hopefully by reaching back into history we might someday learn from our misplaced fear. Letting hatred go unchecked will only burn us alive

60″x37″ ink on panel

 

17 9066 web

Detail:

17 9066 b web

17 9066 a web

Original Dorothea Lange Image:

9066 c web


“Neighbor”

Another in my series of portraits that attempt to depict current social and political extremes. This is a portrait of my neighbor in my apartment building. The marks are made from me writing out all of Trump’s tweets from inauguration day until September 25th, 2017, 1550 entries. I stopped on that date because the piece was done.

60″ x 37″ Ink on panel

 

16 Muslim Woman web

Detail:

16 Muslim Woman b web

16 Muslim Woman a web


“Current and Instinct” 44×56

Mistake and struggle are the pathways to new beginnings. Another piece in my water series. L 11 Current and Instinct 44x56 web


Image

“Indeterminate Depth” 12×12

c 113 Indeterminate Depth 12x12 web


“Inflection” 12×12

My show at George Billis Gallery LA has been extended to July 1st. This is the last week to view the show, please stop by.

 

c 101 Inflection 12x12 web


At George Billis LA Gallery thru June 24th

Please stop by if you are in town, the show looks good.


“The Sound of Color” 17×23

Opening Saturday May 20th, 5-8pm at George Billis Gallery , Los Angeles

c 111The Sound of Color 17x23 web


Studio Visit with Gary Brewer

My friend Gary came by for a studio visit:

Studio visit with Bryan Ida. Thoughts on Origin Myths and Fate…


“Lines Drawn to Yesterday” 44×56

Every time I make a mark its like being in a place I have never beenc 106 Lines Drawn to Yesterday 56x44 web


“Moment by Moment” 35×74

c 107 Moment by Moment 35x74 web

Of utmost importance to me is the development of color and palette. By using so many layers to build the paintings color develops new meaning and depth. Multiple colors layered and blended convey a sense of connectivity and integration while at the same time suggest a feeling of isolation and disconnect.  These two ideas working simultaneously are representative of the contradictory world in which we live.


“Immersion” 23×17

A multilayered exploration into line, memory and color.c 103 Immersion 23x17 web